× Sign Up/Login League - Community Search League HUDDLES - Group Get Togethers Current Huddles Past Huddles PLAYS - Notes Search Plays PLAYBOOKS - Collection of Notes Search Playbooks WHAT IS JoinIN
Plays Notes, like files, can contain text, articles, images, videos, or links to save and share

We recommend this blog from Jen Reviews, a detailed, up-to-date 7,000 word guide on how to sketch, including 15 detailed tips for sketches that come to life. 

  • by JoinIN Team
  • 15 Detailed Tips for Sketches that Come to Life
  • #Design
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Women in the Workplace 2017 Report
  • #general business
  • by Qiana Patterson
  • California bosses can no longer ask you about your previous salary 
  • #Human Resources
The State Street Corporation put a statue on Wall Street to promote "the next generation of women leaders." Now accused of pay discrimination, the firm denies wrongdoing but will pay $5 million.
  • by Qiana Patterson
  • Performative feminism isn't actually feminism.
  • #Human Resources

In case you haven’t noticed, though, you’ve changed from hero to villain. You’re too expensive and exclusive for the rest of the world: The garages that gave us Hewlett-Packard and Google now cost millions of dollars. You’ve moved from icon to joke — the show that bears your name is a cringe-worthy, true-to-life satire.

....

Why might this be? Face the facts: When Silicon Valley investors are considering new ideas, you don’t have very many different perspectives around the table. More than 90 percent of the decision-makers in the venture capital industry are white men.

You’ve known this is a problem for a while, but haven’t done anything to fix it: Less than 5 percent of the new ideas that get funding are founded by women, and less than 1 percent of venture funding goes to Latinos and African-Americans.

You’ve concentrated capital in the hands of a few people (nearly all white guys) who have huge power to determine which people, places and industries get funding. And your decision-makers are often (unintentionally) overlooking ideas that come from people who aren’t like them, which exacerbates gender, racial and geographic divides in our country. Much worse, this financial privilege creates power dynamics that lead to too-frequent cases of investors sexually harassing founders or tone-deaf ideas like Bodega.

....

In short, your present leaders are cannibalizing your future. If a startup is raising money today, one of the first questions they’ll be asked is, “What’s your exit strategy?” Specifically, that means, “Whom among Google, Facebook and a few other companies will acquire you?” A few tech giants are dictating which problems founders want to work on, and how we’ll solve them.

 

The result? You haven’t produced a new firm that has cracked the world’s top 200 since Facebook’s founding in 2003.

 

Solution?

Put as much attention into finding founders as you do deal flow.

Create conditions for the little guy to thrive.

Recognize that business and society are together — not in separate worlds.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Dear Silicon Valley: America’s fallen out of love with you
  • #Startup
  • by JoinIN Team
  • JoinIN Volunteer Week
  • #other

Great Medium piece by Homan Yuen, Managing Partner at NewGen Capital (published on 10/4/17) helps you better understand why VCs ask the questions they ask.

  • by JoinIN Team
  • VC Math (by Homan Yuen on Medium)
  • #Venture Capital
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • From Zero to $13 Million in 12 months – Koala.com’s Growth Strategy
  • #Marketing

Here are some more things developers love hearing from their non-developer co-workers.

“This change shouldn’t take more than a few minutes.”

Thanks, marketing coordinator! I appreciate you telling me that this fix on the site won’t take long in spite of the fact that you have no idea that the website was built in COBOL that someone hacked together when you were five years old.

“Let’s have a meeting!”

Oh man, developers love nothing more than when non-developers ask them to have meetings… about everything! Have to make a decision on colors? Let’s have a meeting! Want to try to convince your team to build it in WordPress? Sounds like a great way to spend three hours I could also use to build that product that’s a month behind. We should schedule a meeting to figure out when we should have this meeting!

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • 11 Things Developers Love Hearing From Non-Developer Co-Workers
  • #Coding/Programming
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Steve Blank's Customer Development
  • #Startup
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Steve Blank's Customer Development
  • #Startup
  • by WMN Team
  • CoWork space & Ecosystem for women led ventures
  • #leadership

Along with Facebook, Microsoft and Apple, these companies are in a race to become our “personal assistant.” They want to wake us in the morning, have their artificial intelligence software guide us through our days and never quite leave our sides. They aspire to become the repository for precious and private items, our calendars and contacts, our photos and documents. They intend for us to turn unthinkingly to them for information and entertainment while they catalogue our intentions and aversions. Google Glass and the Apple Watch prefigure the day when these companies implant their artificial intelligence in our bodies. Brin has mused, “Perhaps in the future, we can attach a little version of Google that you just plug into your brain.”

More than any previous coterie of corporations, the tech monopolies aspire to mold humanity into their desired image of it. They think they have the opportunity to complete the long merger between man and machine — to redirect the trajectory of human evolution. How do I know this? In annual addresses and town hall meetings, the founding fathers of these companies often make big, bold pronouncements about human nature — a view that they intend for the rest of us to adhere to. Page thinks the human body amounts to a basic piece of code: “Your program algorithms aren’t that complicated,” he says. And if humans function like computers, why not hasten the day we become fully cyborg?

To take another grand theory, Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg has exclaimed his desire to liberate humanity from phoniness, to end the dishonesty of secrets. “The days of you having a different image for your work friends or co-workers and for the other people you know are probably coming to an end pretty quickly,” he has said. “Having two identities for yourself is an example of a lack of integrity.” Of course, that’s both an expression of idealism and an elaborate justification for Facebook’s business model.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Perspective | How Silicon Valley is erasing your individuality
  • #Startup

Dean was intrigued enough to lend his “20 percent” — the portion of work hours every Google employee is expected to contribute to programs outside his or her core job — to the project. Pretty soon, he suggested to Ng that they bring in another colleague with a neuroscience background, Greg Corrado. (In graduate school, Corrado was taught briefly about the technology, but strictly as a historical curiosity. “It was good I was paying attention in class that day,” he joked to me.) In late spring they brought in one of Ng’s best graduate students, Quoc Le, as the project’s first intern. By then, a number of the Google engineers had taken to referring to Project Marvin by another name: Google Brain.

Since the term “artificial intelligence” was first coined, at a kind of constitutional convention of the mind at Dartmouth in the summer of 1956, a majority of researchers have long thought the best approach to creating A.I. would be to write a very big, comprehensive program that laid out both the rules of logical reasoning and sufficient knowledge of the world. If you wanted to translate from English to Japanese, for example, you would program into the computer all of the grammatical rules of English, and thenthe entirety of definitions contained in the Oxford English Dictionary, and then all of the grammatical rules of Japanese, as well as all of the words in the Japanese dictionary, and only after all of that feed it a sentence in a source language and ask it to tabulate a corresponding sentence in the target language. You would give the machine a language map that was, as Borges would have had it, the size of the territory. This perspective is usually called “symbolic A.I.” — because its definition of cognition is based on symbolic logic — or, disparagingly, “good old-fashioned A.I.”

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • The Great A.I. Awakening
  • #Leadership

Crunchbase does a great job of explaining the ins and outs of a typical fundraising process with their fictitious chicken drone delivery startup.

We often get asked about the ins and outs of fundraising, and we have referred startups to a lot of resources. So we thought we should share this with all of you.

  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • How Early Seed Funding Works (by Crunchbase 9/5/17)
  • #Angel/Seed

Sebastian Thrun once lamented, “In education people just have these irrational beliefs in these 200 year old brands. That’s the slowest thing holding back innovation.” For schools that are only 5 years old, the collective reputation is as important as any individual schools’ message. If there’s fraud, if there’s betrayal of students, if there’s profiteering, a single school may suffer in the short term but eventually it’ll hurt everyone. Splitting apart the best programs from the at-risk ones is one of the reasons CIRR brought so many competitors together.

EQUIP, the Obama-era initiative, is an experiment allowing students to take out government loans to pay for bootcamp education. If scaled (and so far it’s barely starting up) the program will undermine the basic premise of bootcamps: That education should be clearly ROI-positive for students with schools directly held accountable when it’s not. Government-backed student loans, however, shift focus from outcomes to government certification. This is the road for-profit colleges went down generation ago, turning cheap loans into thousands in personal debt and unmeasurable degrees. EQUIP may be a test but its outcome would be to distort incentives and end other innovation.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • An insider’s take on the future of coding bootcamps
  • #Coding/Programming

“Good Design”

Most people think good design is directly related to beauty. They’re wrong. Good design is about executing a desired outcome through visual communication. Did you notice how ugly our first slide is? This is intentional.

We want people to react viscerally to how messy and uncomfortable the problem is.

We’ve also used an iconic, relatable image to communicate it. Every investor knows that Mark Zuckerberg is a notoriously poor dresser, so this tiny visual joke helps us develop a rapport in addition to articulating the problem our product is about to solve.

 

The Money Shot

Nope, not actual money, because you’re probably not making any yet — we’re talking about your product. Regardless of the story you’ve decided to tell, it’s almost certainly going to include an explanation of what you actually do.

You don’t have time to weave a full demo into a 3 minute pitch, so your goal here is to showcase why your solution is at least 10 times better than all of the alternatives you’ve described thus far.

In our case, we contrast Mylo with two extremely rudimentary versions of the same thing, and show how our solution is more expansive, beautiful, personalized, user-friendly and high tech.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • How to Design a Pitch Deck: Lessons from a Seasoned Founder
  • #Startup

(1) The proper goal of hard work is not personal gain, but organizational contribution, adds Sandberg. “I don’t see that many people coming into the workplace asking what they can do for the company,” she says. “Ask what you can do. I promise you will get mentors. You will get sponsors. You will get results. You will get promotions. You will get opportunities by contributing.”

(2)  “If you try to plan out your career, it’s going to be boring. You’re going to miss all the good stuff, because all the good stuff hasn’t been invented yet,” says Sandberg. “You want to have a really long-run dream and you want to have a short-run plan. And that short-run plan, it’s not about what you accomplish, especially in the early days. It’s about what you help other people accomplish and about what you learn. You invest in yourself. You invest in the success of your teams.”

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Sheryl Sandberg: Develop Your Voice, Not Your Brand
  • #Startup

Hopper was looking for a way to make it easier to program computers with instructions. Entering reams of numbers was complicated and not very intuitive. She discovered a method of programming a computer with words instead of numbers, and in 1959 created a programming language that basically allowed operators to give the computer commands in English. It was called COBOL.

COBOL is still widely used today, especially by banks and governments. It runs on virtually any platform and is very adept with numbers. As such, it’s used in almost all business transactions. Every time you swipe a credit card or sell an investment security, COBOL is involved.

Between 30 and 50 percent of programmers were women in the 1950s, and it was seen as a natural career for them, as evidenced by a 1967 Cosmopolitanfeature about “Computer Girls.”

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Women pioneered computer programming. Then men took their industry over.
  • #Coding/Programming

Once we were airborne, the CEO, who’d brought along a few bottles of wine, started bragging about meeting Jenna Jameson, talking about her career as the world’s greatest porn star and how he had taken a photo with her at the Playboy Mansion. He asked if I knew who she was and then proceeded to describe her pay-per-view series (Jenna’s American Sex Star), on which women competed for porn-movie contracts by performing sex acts before a live audience.

“Nope,” I said. “Not a show I’m familiar with.”

Then the CEO switched topics. To sex workers. He asked Ted what kind of “girls” he liked. Ted said that he preferred white girls — Eastern European, to be specific.

----------------

In venture capital, a ton of power is concentrated in just a few people who all know one another. Tips and information are exchanged at all-male dinners, outings to Vegas, and sports events. Networks are important inside a VC firm, too. One secret of the venture-capital world is that many firms run on vote trading. A person might offer to vote in favor of investing in another partner’s investment so that partner will support his upcoming investment. Many firms, including Kleiner, also had a veto rule: Any one person could veto another member’s investment. No one ever exercised a veto while I was there, but fear of it motivated us to practice the California art of superficial collegiality, where everything seems tan and shiny on the outside but behind closed doors, people would trash your investment, block it, or send you on unending “rock fetches” — time-consuming, unproductive tasks to stall you until you gave up.

Venture capital’s underbelly of competitiveness exists in part because the more I invest, the less money for you, my partner, to make your investments. And we’re all trying to make as many investments as possible because chances are low that any one investment is going to be successful. Partners can increase their own odds by excluding all of your investments. And as a junior partner you faced another dilemma: Your investments could be poached by senior partners. You wanted to pitch your venture so it would be supported but not so much that it would be stolen. Once a senior partner laid claim to a venture you were driving, you were better off just keeping quiet. Otherwise, you could be branded as having sharp elbows and not being a good team player. But this was true, I noticed, only for women. Junior men could sometimes even take ventures from senior partners.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Ellen Pao: This Is How Sexism Works in Silicon Valley
  • #Startup
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • New Women-focused Accelerator in Seattle
  • #Venture Capital

An alternative perspective on the quality of education – with a lens on inequality – is to instead consider the portion of a country’s universities that are globally ranked. This gives a sense of what share of a nation’s population has access to high-quality tertiary education. In fact, the difference between a country’s performance in absolute number of competitive institutions versus share of schools in that country that are internationally ranked is one measure of the scope of inequality in education.

Educational inequality – especially pertaining to the lack of access by the deserving (but underprivileged) to elite schooling – is driving a wedge in society. Elites are cloistered at prestigious universities, while the masses are left to attend less-competitive schools. Not only do elite schools offer better environments for human capital accumulation, but they also act as a place to foster social networks and develop social capital – all the while excluding the less advantaged – that are paramount for life success.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Which countries provide their citizens with the best higher education?
  • #Other

Guanxi, a traditional Chinese concept, refers to longtime acquaintances who have a relationship defined by intimacy, obligation, and a high level of trust. In a business context, the guanxi are a family-like, deeply trusted circle of people who can help grow a business—as opposed to a larger, more professional network where trust and longstanding relationships are not necessarily always present. A guanxi network, says Burt, shares some similarities to what in the US is called the “old boys’ club.” 

For example, some entrepreneurs face what sociologists call “character assassination,” where a person is disparaged by his business contacts. Burt’s previous research—which studied European and American managers—suggests that people who limit themselves to close-knit groups are more likely to badmouth colleagues. In that research, entrepreneurs who made a connection with a key contact in a close-knit group, but who themselves were outside of that group, were most prone to being treated as a source of difficulty, which was attributed to the entrepreneur’s character rather than competence. Additionally, people who complained about others in the confines of a close-knit group also found validation through a type of supportive gossip that sometimes encouraged even more badmouthing.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Good start-ups have great networks
  • #Startup

Great article in Crunchbase by Joanne Glasner summarizes which universities ranked highest in terms of fund raising.

  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Top Schools for Founders
  • #Venture Capital
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Women Can Code – as Long as No One Knows They're Women
  • #other

The company’s leaders — conscious of how expensive real estate is in Shanghai — were interested in the impact of working from home. Could they continue to grow while avoiding exorbitant office space costs? They solicited worker volunteers for a study in which half worked from home for nine months, coming into the office one day a week, and half worked only from the office.

Bloom tracked these two groups for about two years. The results? “We found massive, massive improvement in performance — a 13% improvement in performance from people working at home,” Bloom says.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Why Working From Home Is a “Future-looking Technology”
  • #Startup

To find this reason or purpose, experts recommend starting with four questions:

  • What do you love?
  • What are you good at?
  • What does the world need from you?
  • What can you get paid for?

Finding the answers and a balance between these four areas could be a route to ikigai for Westerners looking for a quick interpretation of this philosophy. But in Japan, ikigai is a slower process and often has nothing to do with work or income.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Is this Japanese concept the secret to a long, happy, meaningful life?
  • #Other

AI is the new electricity

Just as electricity transformed every major industry starting about 100 years ago, AI is now poised to do the same. Several large tech companies have built AI divisions, and started transforming themselves with AI. But in the next few years, companies of all sizes and across all industries will realize that they too must be part of this AI-powered future.

Building an AI-powered society

I hope we can build an AI-powered society that gives everyone affordable healthcare, provides every child a personalized education, makes inexpensive self-driving cars available to all, and provides meaningful work for every man and woman. An AI-powered society that improves every person’s life.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • deeplearning.ai: Announcing new Deep Learning courses on Coursera
  • #Startup
  • by JoinIN Team
  • Congrats to Mixalot, an Early Member of Our Family
  • #startup
  • by Arsames Qajar
  • In Just 1 Tweet Elon Musk Captured the Brutal Truth About Life as an Entrepreneur
  • #Startup
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Awesome Free Tools for Your Startup
  • #General Business
  • by JoinIN Team
  • 4 Key Financial Metrics All Startups Should Measure
  • #Finance
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • 44 Startup Pitch Decks that raised $14bn in funding
  • #General Business

And that will have a huge impact on the future of learning. Because if work is being extracted from jobs, and if jobs and work are being extracted from companies—and because, as you and I have both written, we’re now in a world of flows1—then learning has to become lifelong. We have to provide both the learning tools and the learning resources for lifelong learning when your job becomes work and your company becomes a platform.

So I’m not sure what the work of the future is, but I know that the future of companies is to be hiring people and constantly training people to be prepared for a job that has not been invented yet. If you, as a company, are not providing both the resources and the opportunity for lifelong learning, [you’re sunk], because you simply cannot be a lifelong employee anymore unless you are a lifelong learner. If you’re training people for a job that’s already been invented, or if you’re going to school in preparation for a job that’s already been invented, I would suggest that you’re going to have problems somewhere down the road.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Radically open: Tom Friedman on jobs, learning, and the future of work
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Map of ML Applications
  • #Software

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Just Culture - the Ultimate Case Against Using Shame as a Management Tactic
  • #Leadership

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Female Founded Companies That Got Funded - Infographic
  • #General Business
  • by JoinIN Team
  • What is Ethereum?
  • #Finance

Data. Music CDs, movie DVDs, and web pages have been adding to the world’s stock of digitally encoded information for decades, but over the past few years the rate of creation has exploded. Signals from sensors in smartphones and industrial equipment, digital photos and videos, a nonstop global torrent of social media, and many other sources combine to put us in a totally unprecedented era of data abundance. Ninety percent of the digital data in the world today has been created in the past two years alone. With the burgeoning internet of things (IoT) promising to connect billions of new devices and their data streams, it’s a sure bet we’ll have far more digital data to work with in the coming decade.

Algorithms. The data deluge is important not only because it makes existing algorithms more effective, but also because it encourages, supports, and accelerates the development of better algorithms. The algorithms and approaches that now dominate the discipline — such as deep supervised learning and reinforcement learning — share a vital basic property: Their results improve as the amount of training data they’re given increases. The performance of an algorithm usually levels off at some point, after which feeding it more data has little or no effect. But that does not yet appear to be the case for many of the algorithms being widely used today. At the same time, new algorithms are transferring the learning from one application to another, making it possible to learn from fewer and fewer examples.

Computer hardware. Moore’s Law — that integrated circuit capability steadily doubles every 18 to 24 months — celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2015, at which time it was still going strong. Some have commented recently that it’s running up against the limits of physics and so will slow down in the years to come; and indeed, clockspeed for standard microprocessors has leveled off. But by a fortuitous coincidence, a related type of computer chip, called a graphic processing unit, or GPU, turns out to be very effective when applied to the types of calculations needed for neural nets. In fact, speedups of 10X are not uncommon when neural nets are moved from traditional central processing units to GPUs. GPUs were initially developed to rapidly display graphics for applications such as computer gaming, which provided scale economies and drove down unit costs, but an increasing number of them are now used for neural nets. As neural net applications become even more common, several companies have developed specialized chips optimized for this application, including Google’s tensor processing unit, or TPU. According to Shane Legg, a cofounder of Google DeepMind, a training run that takes one day on a single TPU device would have taken a quarter of a million years on an 80486 from 1990. This can generate about another 10-fold improvement.

 

Also, highly recommend this series on HBR -
https://hbr.org/cover-story/2017/07/the-business-of-artificial-intelligence

link --> https://hbr.org/2017/07/artificial-intelligence-real-food

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Machine Learning & DS
  • #coding/programming
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Lessons "Unlearned"
  • #general business
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • The Slack for Gamers that overtook Slack
  • #Software

Wall Street Journal

Wednesday July 19, 2017, 4:20 pm ET

 

The S&P 500’s information-technology sector ended the day at 992.29, closing above its previous all-time high of 988.49 set in March 2000 at the peak of the dot-com bubble. Tech stocks are by far the best-performing among the index’s 11 sectors this year, up 23% after posting their ninth consecutive day of gains on Wednesday.

  • by JoinIN Team
  • New All-time high for the S&P 500 Technology Sector
  • #General Business

See if you've heard of most of these LA Startups who have raised over $100M.

  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • The Most Well-Funded Tech Startups In Greater LA (CB Insights)
  • #Other
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • The Tenets of A/B Testing from Duolingo's Master Growth Hacker
  • #Marketing

What if my site still doesnt read “Secure” in the url? Why is that?
The most common reason I’ve found is because of scripts or images that are being called into the page that dont contain the “https” prefix.
Make sure to go through all elements of all your pages, including any images, css, or scripts that are being called in and make sure they have the prefix “https” and not “http”.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Heroku, Godaddy and SSL Certs walk into a Bar
  • #Coding/Programming
  • by JoinIN Team
  • Startup Diversity and Leadership
  • #other

“In the future, a robot will simply be a physical entity controlled by artificial intelligence interacting with the world. In a few years, we’ll have robots that look like us that we can control from afar. Called avatars, this will enable us to be there without traveling, for example, give a speech, mingle with the audience, cook a meal, visit with a loved one, do rescues, perform remote surgery, and many other tasks. Robots are already carrying out missions in dangerous environments (as the French did recently in a terrorist incident).

To me, the most exciting future mission of robots will be to carry out medical interventions inside our body. I recently swallowed such a robot, which went through my digestive tract sending signals and movies to look for problems (I was fine!). In the 2030s, these medical robots will be blood cell sized. They’ll start out by delivering medications to precise places where they are needed. Ultimately, they will extend our immune system to kill pathogens (such as cancer cells), carry out micro surgery (such as removing plaque from our arteries), augment the function of failing organs, and a myriad of other health interventions.”

- Ray Kurzwei

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • What is a robot?
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Heather Wetzler
  • Joan C. Williams is one of the top researchers in the world when it comes to gender bias at work - piece she just wrote for Harvard Business Review on why Sexual Harassment is particularly bad in venture capital.
  • #Human Resources

“Empathetic language” shows concern for the performer as a human being. It can include praise, encouragement, gratitude, and acknowledgment of a task’s difficulty. Phrases like “How are we all doing?” “I know this is a challenge, but I trust you can do it,” and “Your well-being is one of my top priorities” all fit into this category.

“Meaning-making language” explains why a task is important. This involves linking the organization’s purpose or mission to listeners’ goals. Often, meaning-making language includes the use of stories—about people who’ve worked hard or succeeded in the company, or about how the work has made a real difference in the lives of customers or the community.

A good pep talk—whether delivered to one person or many—should include all three elements, but the right mix will depend on the context and the audience. Experienced workers who are doing a familiar task may not require much direction. Followers who are already tightly bonded with a leader may require less empathetic language. Meaning making is useful in most situations, but may need less emphasis if the end goals of the work are obvious.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • The Science of Pep Talks
  • #Leadership

Highlight here to start!

  • by Andrew Boston
  • BCG Digital Ventures Commitment to Diversity
  • #Leadership

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Ignition Partner MP Resigns Amid Sexual Misconduct Allegations
  • #Venture Capital
  • by JoinIN Team
  • US Tech startups fight sexual harassment with tougher policies
  • #Other

From Poland, with Love!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • FREE Tool for Email Sending Time Optimization
  • #Marketing

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Vatican Launched Their Own Startup Accelerator
  • #General Business

Figuring out how to get humans and AI algorithms to collaborate effectively could have big economic significance, and it could shape the way the workforce is educated. It might also play a role in tempering negative reactions to the growing role of automation in many settings (see “Is Technology Destroying Jobs?” and “Who Will Own the Robots?”).

Barbara Grosz, a professor at Harvard University who has long argued that computer scientists should design AI systems to complement rather than replace people, says this approach is needed because AI is still so limited in what it can do. Grosz adds that human and machine capabilities can add up to more than the sum of their parts. “AI systems, like all computers, need to be developed for the people who are going to use them,” she says.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Your best teammate might someday be an AI algorithm
  • #Coding/Programming
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Why Arts Need Startup Incubators
  • #Other

The summit on "Inventing the Future of Education" held in April 2016 was sponsored by Stanford, Berkeley, Harvard and MIT,  to examine the results to date of the “great experimentation” and call for new research to help measure effectiveness and establish best practices regarding MOOCs.

“We’ve seen that online resources can be very important,” Dirks said. “But at the same time they don’t substitute for being there” – for personal contact with faculty or the sense of community that residential undergraduate institutions provide. So far, he added, MOOCs have been “most spectacularly successful for students who have graduated," said Nicholas Dirks, chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley.

  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Inventing the Future of Education 
  • #Other
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • YC Female Founders Conference
  • #Other
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Ed Tech Market Map (CB Insights)
  • #Other
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Status of Black Women in America 2017 Report (Full)
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • 4 Most Important Findings From a New Report on Black Women in America
  • #Leadership

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Dave McClure's (500 Startups) Apology Letter
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Complete Guide to Instagram Ads
  • #Marketing

 

Posterous, the startup I cofounded in 2008, grew 10X yearly and became a top 200 Quantcast website in that time. But by the end of 2010, growth had flatlined.When things were going well, we were too busy keeping the site online to have anything to disagree about.

I learned the hard way that if you haven’t prepared for conflict in your co-founder relationship, you’ll be at each other’s throats right at the moment when you most need to be working well together.

The mistake that my cofounder and I made was in avoiding the dynamics of our co-founder marriage altogether. We rarely spoke directly and honestly with one another. We didn’t stop to reflect on what he needed or I needed. We never sought professional support to ensure the health of our partnership. When the honeymoon ended, there was no healthy foundation to support the company.

During my time as a partner at Y Combinator, we always looked closely at how well co-founders knew each other before they started. Most people think of good co-founding pairs in purely functional terms: a business person paired with a technical person. This is deeper than that, because when conflict does arise (and it always does), if you have nothing in common other than the startup, you’ll struggle to find common ground at the worst of times. It’s necessary for founders to have something in common, but not sufficient in and of itself.

In my case, I had known my co-founder for over 8 years and we had been friends since college. We had history, but we learned history is not enough — you’ve got to maintain it like any relationship. It isn’t enough that you have been friends for years. It matters what your relationship is like now.

 

Successful co-founders actually embrace conflict, and are constantly in the process of resolving it. If you can’t argue and arrive at the best solution, you’re not doing the work to actually have a real, healthy working relationship.

You have to actually lean into the conflict and come out with a solution that makes sense, over and over again. If you find yourself avoiding it, then you have to consciously expend effort to fight that default behavior.

Don’t agree on something? Don’t leave the room until you have a resolution.

An hour not enough? Cancel your weekend, go on a hike, and figure it out.

In these situations, there’s nothing more important than for you and your cofounders to do the work and come out of it stronger.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Co-founder Conflict
  • #Other

There is an enormous gender gap in venture capital funding in the United States. Female entrepreneurs receive only about 2% of all venture funding, despite owning 38% of the businesses in the country. The prevailing hope among academics, policy makers, and practitioners alike has been that this gap will narrow as more women become venture capitalists. However, homophily does not seem to be the only culprit behind the funding gap. Over the past several years, the U.S. has seen an increase in the number of female venture capitalists (from 3% of all VCs in 2014 to an estimated 7% today), but the funding gap has only widened.

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Male and Female Entrepreneurs Get Asked Different Questions by VCs — and It Affects How Much Funding They Get
  • #Venture Capital

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Top 50 Smartest Companies by MIT
  • #Other
  • by JoinIN Team
  • YC Startup School Founders Night
  • #Other
  • by Alexandra Cheng
  • UX: a ROI of 9,900%?
  • #Human Resources
  • by Alexandra Cheng
  • How Behavioral Science Fits into UX
  • #Marketing
  • by Michal Clements
  • Gen Z
  • #Marketing

Mark Zuckerberg:

"I believe the most important thing we can do is work to bring people closer together. It's so important that we're changing Facebook's whole mission to take this on.

For the past decade, we've focused on making the world more open and connected. We're not done yet and we will continue working to give people a voice and help people connect. But even as we make progress, our society is still divided. So now I believe we have a responsibility to do even more. It's not enough to simply connect the world; we must also work to bring the world closer together.

We need to give people a voice to get a diversity of opinions out there, but we also need to build enough common ground so we can all make progress together. We need to stay connected with people we already know and care about, but we also need to meet new people with new perspectives. We need support from family and friends, but we also need to build communities to support us as well.

Our new mission will continue our path and set our course for the next decade.

The idea for our mission is: "bring the world closer together".

The full mission statement is: "give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together". This reflects that we will not accomplish this mission ourselves, but by empowering people around the world to build communities and bring people together.

Our lives are all connected. In the next generation, our greatest opportunities and challenges we can only take on together -- ending poverty, curing diseases, stopping climate change, spreading freedom and tolerance, stopping violence. No single group or even nation can do them alone.

This isn't going to happen top down. Change starts local, when enough of us feel a sense of purpose and support in our own lives that we can start caring about broader issues too.

Communities give us that sense that we are part of something greater than ourselves, that we are not alone, and that we have something better ahead to work for.

This is our challenge. We have to build a world where every single person has a sense of purpose and community. That's how we'll bring the world closer together.

A mission isn't just a statement. It's a nuanced philosophy and hope for the world. We carry out our mission not through repeating a statement, but in the work each of us do every day. And if enough of us work to build community and bring people together, then we just might change the world.

Thank you for all you do for your communities and for the world. It's an honor to be on this mission with you, and I'm looking forward to doing this together."

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Facebook Changes Their Mission
  • #Other

The survey results show that no single management skill stands out above the rest. Respondents indicated that founders need to be management jacks-of-all-trades, so to speak. For eight out of 10 skill areas that we listed, at least 65% of respondents said that an aspiring founder should give high or very high priority to acquiring skills in that domain. As one respondent said, “Every one of these skills is important. The question is: For which skills will the CEO build deep personal expertise, and which will they outsource to other founding team members?”

 

 

Customer discovery and user-centered product design skills are paramount. Many respondents stressed that, during a startup’s early stages, its founders must gain a deep understanding of customer needs, and then must build on that understanding through rapid iteration and testing to prove product-market fit. As one respondent said, “Nothing else matters if you are building a product that no one wants.” Highlighting the importance of customer discovery research and lean experimentation, another noted, “Tech founders, sure that they already know what to build, are too often dismissive when told they should talk to customers.”

 

Always be closing? Respondents viewed selling as a crucial skill for founders, and noted that this encompassed more than just product sales. One said, “Having studied engineering in college, selling was the number one skill set that I was missing when I launched a company. As a founder, you are always selling: first to yourself and maybe a significant other, and then to potential cofounders, employees, customers, strategic partners, and investors.” Another added, “I was surprised how critical it is for a startup CEO to be great storyteller. Being able to craft and communicate a compelling story about why you are doing what you’re doing can inspire others to join you and fund you.”

Negotiations are never-ending. Respondents pointed out that negotiating was missing from the list of skills we asked about. One commented, “As with selling, a founder is constantly negotiating. Selecting the right partners and then structuring win-win deals with them is a vital skill — one that our aspiring founder didn’t learn in college engineering courses.”

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • What Does an Aspiring Founder Need to Know?
  • #Leadership

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Sexism in Tech and Hurtful Coping Mechanisms
  • #Coding/Programming

Product managers are the glue that bind the many functions that touch a product—engineering, design, customer success, sales, marketing, operations, finance, legal, and more. They not only own the decisions about what gets built but also influence every aspect of how it gets built and launched.

Unlike product managers of the past, who were primarily focused on execution and were measured by the on-time delivery of engineering projects, the product manager of today is increasingly the mini-CEO of the product. They wear many hats, using a broad knowledge base to make trade-off decisions, and bring together cross-functional teams, ensuring alignment between diverse functions. What’s more, product management is emerging as the new training ground for future tech CEOs.

As more companies outside of the technology sector set out to build software capabilities for success in the digital era, it’s critical that they get the product-management role right.

 

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Product managers for the digital world
  • #Project Management

But rigor is the key to overcoming obstacles and completing tasks—and good mood doesn’t improve problem-solving, which involves judgments that almost by necessity won’t feel good: critique and evaluation, experimentation and failure. The stress that arises from problems may be unpleasant but it also motivates us to complete tasks, Davis says. In other words, negative emotions are actually beneficial to the creative process.

That said, psychologists aren’t suggesting that you live in an emotional maelstrom for creativity’s sake. Emma Seppala, Science Director at the Stanford University Center for Compassion and Altruism and author of The Happiness Track explains, “High-intensity positive emotions can sometimes be just as taxing as high negative emotions. Creativity does not so much happen when we are stressed and highly emotional.”

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Scientists explain how happiness makes us less creative
  • #Other

In Baumol’s theoretical framework, depressed rates of entrepreneurship aren’t the culprit for periods of slow economic growth; rather, a change in the mix of entrepreneurial effort between the two kinds of entrepreneurship is to blame — specifically, a decline in productive entrepreneurship and a coincident rise in unproductive entrepreneurship. But is this what’s actually happening in the U.S.?

Well, for starters, we and others have documented a pervasive decline in the rate of new firm formation during the last three decades and an acceleration in that decline since 2000. In fact, we found that by 2009 the rate of business closures exceeded the rate of business births for the first time in the three-decades-plus history of our data. This decline in startup formation has occurred in each state and nearly all metropolitan areas, and in each broad industrial sector, including high tech. There has also been a slowdown in activity of high-growth firms, the relatively small number of businesses that account for the lion’s share of net job gains. All of this points to a slowdown in the growth of productive entrepreneurship.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Is America Encouraging the Wrong Kind of Entrepreneurship?
  • #General Business

The Wall Street Journal set out to identify companies that show signs of becoming emerging leaders. A data analysis assessed their founders' experience, investor track record, amount of investments raised, growth of workforce and buzz about the company. These five factors were given an equal weighting to calculate a maximum score of 100.

 

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Tech Companies to Watch - The Wall Street Journal ranks 25 emerging leaders in hot corners of the tech industry
  • #general business

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Full List of 1000 Communities on Slack
  • #General Business
  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Beautiful Email Templates for Startups
  • #Design

Learning machine learning and deep learning is difficult for newbies. As well as deep learning libraries are difficult to understand.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Essential Cheat Sheets for Machine Learning and Deep Learning Engineers
  • #Coding/Programming

It may sound far-fetched in 2017 to trust your finances to an AI-powered digital assistant with a cutesy name, but accelerators are betting that in a few years, that’s going to change. One case in point is Penny, a Y Combinator-backed mobile app that functions as a personal finance coach. It’s one of several personal finance apps accelerators are rolling out.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Here’s what the top accelerators in North America are funding
  • #General Business

Don’t ask “which product do you use to solve that problem today?” because they might not use a specific product.

Instead, ask “so how do you handle that today?” and just listen. They might use a product or they might hack together a bunch of tools or processes to solve the problem.

 

 

 

You then want to come up with a list of 20–50 prospects who meet this criteria. The easiest way to get that list is to jump on LinkedIn and research. Then just connect with all of the prospects you find with a message like this:

 

Hi [name],

We’re hoping to spend 15 minutes on the phone with CEOs who are experiencing [problem]. We’re doing research and have nothing to sell. Would you be available for a quick call tomorrow at 3pm?

 

A few pointers here:

  • Be short and to the point — don’t waste their time.
  • Include a specific day and time when you want to talk — avoids email ping pong.
  • Reach out to 3x the number of prospects you actually want to talk to. So if you want to talk to 20, message 60. Most won’t reply and some won’t be interested.
  • by Arsames Qajar
  • How to Test & Validate Your Startup Idea or Product Without Spending a Single Dollar
  • #General Business

2016 Halo report - an overview of Angel Investing and top angel groups

  • by ALEX NASCIMENTO
  • 2016 Halo report
  • #Angel/Seed
  • by Jeannette Kremer
  • "Tech Cities 1.0" Report
  • #Other

If anyone is looking for a great product manufacturer in Los Angeles, I would highly recommend Sunscope.

To date they've helped me perfect my product design and create affordable prototypes. I am currently in the machine tooling stage, and will proceed to production within 30 days. Their headquarters is located in Commerce, CA, however, they own and partner with factories in China for their molds and production.

Please see below for a more in-depth explanation of the services they provide. If you end up reaching out to them, please let them know that I recommended you. I'm also glad to answer any questions you might have about the production process that I've experienced with this company.

 

Thanks and good luck! 

 

U.S.A.

HEADQUARTERS

 

Established in 1943, Sunscope® has been recognized by the Advertising Specialty Institute as a Top 25 Supplier since 1997.

A family run third generation business, Sunscope® has built itself as the leader in the Promotional Products Industry by offering:

 

  • Catalogs featuring thousands of items

  • Large inventory over ($20,000,000) in our Los Angeles facilities ready to ship immediately

  • A complete line of soft and hard innovative and exciting promotional products

  • In-house decorating for all items

  • Sales offices throughout the United States

  • Award winning customer service

  • Over 400 exclusive Patented Products designed by our in-house design team.

  • 200,000 sq.ft Los Angeles Facility.

  • Custom Overseas sourcing for every Product.

  • Custom Product Design.

  • Complete In-House Manufacturing.

  • Complete Distribution & Warehousing Solutions.

  • Certified Minority Owned Supplier.

 

Sun Coast Merchandise Corporation 
 
 
  • by Gina Brucato
  • Great Product Manufacturer in Los Angeles, CA
  • #Design

Highlight here to start!

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • JoinIN Product Video
  • #General Business

For example, it is hard to see how Dyson would have gotten to industrial cyclones from thinking about vacuum cleaner bags. But an alternative way to describe the problem is that a vacuum takes in a combination of dirt and air and has to separate the dirt from the air. Bags do this by acting as a filter that traps the dirt and lets the air pass through pores in the bag. But there are many ways to separate particles from air. Industrial cyclones create a spinning mass of air that throws particles to the edges by centrifugal force.

 

This way of describing a vacuum is that it generalizes the problem by removing some of the specific components typically used to solve it. The phrase “separating dirt from air” does not mention the bag at all. When you focus on the bag, you’ll naturally be reminded of aspects of bags. The large list of patent numbers on most vacuum cleaner bags suggests that many inventors have done just that. A radically new solution to a problem, though, requires a new problem statement.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • How You Define the Problem Determines Whether You Solve It
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • The Art and Benefits of a Single Work Uniform
  • #Other

Being successful is having the freedom and the options available to you to do anything and everything you want," says Wong, who insists — "this isn't just money."

 

It's easy to believe that one day, when you have accomplished some specific goal, then you will be happy. That the goal will make you happy. While that way of thinking may be motivating, it's also fundamentally flawed, says Brian Wong.

"Happiness and success are two very different things," he tells CNBC.

Wong knows what success looks like. He's 26 and CEO of Kiip, the mobile advertising company he founded. Kiip is on track to do more than $20 million in revenue for 2017 and works with mega companies including McDonald's and Coca Cola.

 

Wong graduated from college at 18 — the age at which most people are just starting. (He skipped four grades in primary school and graduated high school at 14.) He launched Kiip at just 19, and at the ripe old age of 20, he was a self-made millionaire. He's also an author. Wong wrote about his tips to success in his book, "The Cheat Code."

 

 

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • What happiness and success mean to this 26-year-old CEO and self-made millionaire
  • #Leadership
  • by Jeannette Kremer
  • On the Move?
  • #other

The Problems with Facebook

The way Facebook’s News Feed works is that the more you “engage” with posts from a particular user, the more often their posts are shown to you. The more you engage with a particular kind of post, the more you will see its ilk. So far so good! It’s just showing you what you’ve demonstrated you’re interested in. What’s wrong with that?

The answer is twofold. First, this eventually constructs a small “in-group” cluster of Facebook friends and topics that dominate your feed; and as you grow accustomed to interacting with them, this causes your behavior to change, and you interact with them even more, reinforcing their in-group status … and (relatively) isolating you from the rest of your friends, the out-group.

Second, and substantially worse, because “engagement” is the metric, Facebook inevitably selects for the shocking and the outrageous. Ev Williams summed up the results brilliantly:

View image on Twitter
 
 
...

Mark Zuckerberg’s recent comments to the effect that “Facebook is … working on a way to connect you with people that you should know like mentors.”

 

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Facebook & Are We Better Off?
  • #Leadership

Harvard Business review by Steve Blank, May 2013 Issue

  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Why the Lean Start-up Changes Everything?
  • #General Business

Since 1994, Dow has invested nearly $2 billion in improving resource efficiency and has saved $9.8 billion from reduced energy and wastewater consumption in manufacturing.  In 2013, GE had reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 32% and water use by 45% compared to 2004 and 2006 baselines, respectively, resulting in $300 million in savings.

A focus on sustainability can also unlock opportunities for process and logistics savings. Wal-Mart, for example, aimed to double fleet efficiency between 2005 and 2015 through better routing, truck loading, driver training, and advanced technologies. By the end of 2014, they had improved fuel efficiency approximately 87% compared to the 2005 baseline. In that year, these improvements resulted in 15,000 metric tons of CO2 emissions avoided and savings of nearly $11 million.

Mounting evidence shows that sustainable companies deliver significant positive financial performance, and investors are beginning to value them more highly. Arabesque and University of Oxford reviewed the academic literature on sustainability and corporate performance and found that 90% of 200 studies analyzed conclude that good ESG standards lower the cost of capital; 88% show that good ESG practices result in better operational performance; and 80% show that stock price performance is positively correlated with good sustainability practices.

Here are some other datapoints to consider: Between 2006 and 2010, the top 100 sustainable global companies experienced significantly higher mean sales growth, return on assets, profit before taxation, and cash flows from operations in some sectors compared to control companies. During the 2008 recession, companies committed to sustainability practices achieved “above average” performance in the financial markets, translating into an average of $650 million in incremental market capitalization per company. Additionally, companies with superior environmental performance experienced lower cost of debt by 40-45 basis points. Studies also suggest that companies with strong corporate responsibility reputations “experience no meaningful declines in share price compared to their industry peers during crises” versus firms with poor CSR reputations whose reputations declined by “2.4-3%; a market capitalization loss of $378M per firm.”

Investors are paying attention. According to the 2015 EY Global Institutional Investor Survey, investors are increasingly using companies’ nonfinancial disclosures to inform their investment decisions. In its survey of over 200 institutional investors, 59.1% of respondents view nonfinancial disclosures as “essential” or “important” to investment decisions, up from 34.8% in 2014. Some 62.4% of investors are concerned about the risk of stranded assets (i.e. assets that lose value prematurely due to environmental, social, or other external factors) and over one-third of respondents reported cutting their holdings of a company in the past year because of this risk.

 

 

Also a great article on Creating Shared value - https://hbr.org/2011/01/the-big-idea-creating-shared-value

 

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • The Comprehensive Business Case for Sustainability
  • #Leadership
  • by Sonya Sepahban
  • Why Huddle? Let's See What Tom Brady Has to Say
  • #other
  • by Jeannette Kremer
  • Nest is Google's Home Security
  • #Software

To some students drawn to the classes, coding does not come easily. The coursework can be time-consuming. Troves of code online, on sites like GitHub, may have answers to the very assignment the student is wrestling with, posted by someone who previously took the course.

“You’ve got kids who were struggling with spending a third of their time on their problem sets with the option to copy from the internet,” said Jackson Wagner, who took the Harvard course in 2015 and was not accused of copying. “That’s the reason why people cheat.”

Complicating matters is the collaborative ethos among programmers, which encourages code-sharing in ways that might not be acceptable in a class. Professors also frequently allow students to discuss problems among themselves, but not to share actual code, a policy that some students say creates confusion about what constitutes cheating.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • As Computer Coding Classes Swell, So Does Cheating
  • #Coding/Programming

"If Facebook were a country, it would be bigger than China," says Mr Joler, whose day job is as a professor at Serbia's Novi Sad University.

He reels off the familiar, but still staggering, numbers: the barely teenage Silicon Valley firm stores some 300 petabytes of data, boasts almost two billion users, and raked in almost $28bn (£22bn) in revenues in 2016 alone.

And yet, Mr Joler argues, we know next to nothing about what goes on under the bonnet - despite the fact that we, as users, are providing most of the fuel - for free.

"All of us, when we are uploading something, when we are tagging people, when we are commenting, we are basically working for Facebook," he says.

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • How Facebook's tentacles reach further than you think
  • #Other

The talk addresses a common pattern: "You think of an idea, you come up with a plan, and then revise your original idea to fit a great plan and then, and only then, do you go out and execute it... The process we use has a strong bias against surprising ideas"

You are less likely to come up with a genius, nevertheless original idea if you are focused on just minimizing risk. "It is a flawless system for maximizing your resources since thinking is usually super cheap and execution is expensive. And you are more likely to do something that has been done before."

  • by JoinIN Team
  • TED Talk: Why Brainstorms Lead to Unoriginal Ideas--and What to Do Instead
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • 2017 Internet Trends Report by Kleiner Perkins
  • #Venture Capital

In America, for example, mothers devote nearly twice as much time to child care and housework as their male partners. Even couples with grand plans for an egalitarian partnership typically revert to more traditional roles after the birth of a child. A new study of the time-diaries of highly educated dual-earning American couples found that new fathers enjoyed up to three-and-a-half times as much leisure as their female partners, as mothers who worked full time were still stuck with the lion’s share of unpaid labour.

 

Most people assume that gender is simply a scheme for classifying differences or a template for guiding the behaviour of children. The reality is more pernicious. We typically prize the attributes we associate with men, such as competence, strength, virility and stoicism, and underestimate the qualities we associate with women, like warmth, tenderness and compassion. We usually see masculinity in terms of power and dominance and femininity in terms of softness and subservience. We defer to men and indulge women. In other words, gender is not merely a bunch of traits embodied by individuals, but a subtle stratification system that often advantages men and disadvantages women.

 

Among professionals, fathers report being just as frustrated with their working hours as mothers, and are often just as distressed about not spending enough time with their children. But uncertainty over how other men will view them makes them less likely to take advantage of child-friendly policies, and far more resistant to becoming stay-at-home parents themselves. In a recent survey of millennial men, Sarah Thébaud of the University of California, Santa Barbara, and David S. Pedulla of the University of Texas at Austin found that men were more inclined to use flexibility benefits when they believed their male colleagues would do the same. Other studies of paternity-leave policies have found that men take the benefit only when it is clearly meant for men and other fathers are using it too. A study in Norway, for example, found that men were far more likely to take leave if their brothers or male co-workers had taken it already.

Otherwise most men assume that even gender-neutral flexibility policies are meant for women, and that if they take advantage of them, they will incur their colleagues’ disdain. Many are haunted by the views of colleagues like Chase, a father in his late 40s who is a partner at an international law firm in Chicago. “When I see a woman who has children and I know she and her husband are working like crazy, that concerns me for the sake of the kids,” he says. “But when I see stay-at-home dads, I don’t think very highly of them. Call it sexist, call it whatever you want, but I think it’s kind of wimpy to do that. It’s checking out, not being in the game, not fighting for success. Those are the traits I value.”

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Gender Inequality and the Modern Workforce
  • #Other

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • Analysis + Infographic: What Jobs Will be Lost to Automation?
  • #Angel/Seed

Highlight here to start!

  • by Pawel Jaszczurowski
  • New Job Boards for the Gig Economy?
  • #Human Resources

Similarly, when you first become a manager, it’s helpful to spend time up front connecting and creating a common language with your team. When your team knows how you like to work and how you plan to manage them, they’re able to produce results faster. When you know how each of your direct reports likes to work and communicate, you’re able to save time when setting direction and following up.

 

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Do You Know How Each Person on Your Team Likes to Work?
  • #Leadership

Soon, the question of a name came up. Williams jokingly suggested calling the project “Friendstalker,” which was ruled out as too creepy. Glass became obsessive, flipping through a physical dictionary, almost word by word, looking for the right name. One late afternoon, alone in his apartment, he reached over to his cellphone and turned it to silent, which caused it to vibrate. He quickly considered the name “Vibrate,” which he nixed, but it led him to the word “twitch.” He dismissed that too, but he continued through the “Tw” section of the dictionary: twist, twit, twitch, twitcher, twitchy . . . and then, there it was. He read the definition aloud. “The light chirping sound made by certain birds.” This is it, he thought. “Agitation or excitement; flutter.” Twitter.

  • by JoinIN Team
  • All Is Fair in Love and Twitter
  • #Leadership

Highlight here to start!

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • TALENT BATTLE: HEDGE FUNDS VS. SILICON VALLEY
  • #Human Resources

Highlight here to start!

  • by JoinIN Team
  • How artificial intelligence and deep learning secretly control what you see on Facebook
  • #Other

Speculatively, though, it appears to work like this. When you scan your Amazon Go app at the turnstiles, it logs you in via NFC, the technology Apple Pay uses to let you pay with your smartphone. This initial scan essentially gives Amazon permission to track you and bill you for what you take from the shelves. From there, Amazon starts tracking your face with ubiquitous video cams throughout the store, essentially tying your physical identity to your Amazon account. From there, it uses computer vision to detect which sections of the store you visit and where you take your products from. When you walk through the turnstiles again, it recognizes your face, logs you out, and bills your Amazon credit card.

Even if this isn’t exactly the way the technology works, the effect is the same: it means that when you shop at an Amazon Go store, you’ll be under constant video surveillance, with AIs poring over your every move to analyze how you shop. Considering the fact that Instagram and other networks will already target you with ads for Amazon items you literally looked at once, the world’s largest e-retailer will soon be able to gather just as much data on how you shop in meatspace as it does online.

Is the convenience of walking into a store and not having to deal with a clerk worth giving Amazon that level of scrutiny into your meatspace consumer habits? Possibly not, but when Amazon in its video says it has spent the past four years asking what shopping would look like if you could just walk in, grab what you want, and go, that’s what the company really means: it has spent four years figuring out how to start tracking you in the real world as effectively as it does online.

 

 

 

Read more here - https://www.fastcodesign.com/3066283/theres-no-checkout-at-amazons-ai-grocery-because-it-already-knows-what-youre-buying

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Introducing Amazon Go and the world’s most advanced shopping technology
  • #General Business

If straight-up, silent meditation makes you nervous, don’t be. Mindfulness techniques varied drastically, from traditional, in-person meditation sessions, to mindfulness apps, to listening to the same music track every day on repeat.

 

 

  • by Arsames Qajar
  • Why Tim Ferriss Believes Meditation Is the Key to Success
  • #leadership